Harvesting corn

Posted by & filed under the accidental gardener.

 

corn patch

They said it was Tibetan milling corn. Non-GMO. I got it at The March Against Monsanto rally I attended earlier this year. I decided to try it. At least to preserve more seed for the future.

Along the way, I thought I’d taste it and see if it was good for eating the corn-on-the-cob way. It’s not called sweet corn and it’s not sweet. So, it lives up to its purpose, only I hardly have enough ears to mill much corn meal. So my plan is to dry it, and next year, plant a larger crop, along with a crop of sweet corn, which will have to be distanced from each other so they don’t cross pollinate. We’re looking into clearing more land, but not sure we’ll have a field ready for next year. So, we’ll see what really happens.

Meanwhile, ears were ready for harvesting, some I left on to further mature (if they will in this weather), and I also wanted some corn stalks for decorating!

Here is the thinned out crop:

corn field, thinned

Here are the decorations…

lamp post 1 lamp post 2

And here is the harvest…

corn ears

It was pretty good-looking corn, grown with no pesticides. There were some minute black bugs in some of the layers, but not a lot, and no worms. The kernels were left unscathed. Too bad it wasn’t sweet because it looked like it should be plunged into a pot of boiling water and enjoyed!

Instead, they are drying. Found a nice little spot in the unfinished part of my basement that already had a rope up, I don’t remember why it was there, but it must have been for this moment, because it’s perfect…

corn drying
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